LEES640 Doctoral Seminar in Learning Environments and Educational Studies

Last updated January 6, 2017

Instructor Information

Lisa Yamagata-Lynch
Educational Psychology and Counseling
513 Bailey Education Complex
University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996
Phone: 865-974-7712
LisaYL@utk.edu

http://www.lisayamagatalynch.net/

*Please note that the instructor reserves the right to modify the syllabus during the semester and participants will be notified

Meeting Time Monday 5:45PM- 8:35PM

Office Hours Monday 4:00pm-5:00pm at BEC 513 Other appointments can be arranged upon request including online meetings

Catalog Description

Seminar focused preparing students to engage in team based research in areas related to Learning Environments and Educational Studies exploring various topics and emphasizing aspects of the  program that go beyond coursework, comprehensive exams and dissertations.

Course Format

This course will be delivered primarily face-to-face. As you are graduate students, I am going to assume you are a professional and I will treat you as such. That means I am not going to tell you what you need to know, check attendance, or try to motivate you. I assume that you are going to take responsibility for your own learning in this course. Please review the Classroom Etiquette section carefully to understand your responsibilities as a professional participant in this course. If you choose to engage in activities that are unprofessional, disrespectful to others, or disruptive you will lose points toward course participation.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Understand how to actively participate in a team-based research project including journal article preparation;
  • Identify issues related to dissertation and journal article writing;
  • Identify their career paths as a doctoral student and future academic or non-academic professional.

    Recommended Texts for your Doctoral Career

    • American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition (6th ed.). American Psychological Association (APA).

    Readings

    • Initial readings are assigned and provided electronically, others will be determined as a team.

    Course Resources

    MyUTK https://my.utk.edu/
    Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research http://web.utk.edu/~edpsych/gradcert_qualresearch.html
    Graduate Catalog: catalog.utk.edu/index.php?catoid=7/ (Listing of academic programs, courses, and policies)
    Hilltopics: dos.utk.edu/hilltopics (Campus and academic policies, procedures and standards of conduct)
    Course Timetable bannerssb.utk.edu/kbanpr/bwckschd.p_disp_dyn_sched (Schedule of classes)
    Academic Planning www.utk.edu/advising (Advising resources, course requirements, and major guides)
    Student Success Center studentsuccess.utk.edu (Academic support resources)

    Instructor Generated Resources

    10 Habits of Being a Successful Graduate Student and Beyond
    How do I know when an article is peer Reviewed?
    Peer Reviewed Article Matrix

    Resources for Searching Journal Articles

    Course Communications

    You will regularly receive course related communications from the instructor through email and through BlackBoard announcements. It is your responsibility to make sure that your university email account is in working condition. If you have technical issues or need help troubleshooting, please contact OIT at remedy.utk.edu/contact/ or call the helpdesk at 865-974-9900. You should expect your instructor to respond to your message within 24 hours on regular business days during the week and 48 hours on weekends and university holidays. If you do not hear back from the instructor, please send another message or call 865-974-7712.

    University Civility Statement

    Civility is genuine respect and regard for others: politeness, consideration, tact, good manners, graciousness, cordiality, affability, amiability and courteousness. Civility enhances academic freedom and integrity, and is a prerequisite to the free exchange of ideas and knowledge in the learning community. Our community consists of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and campus visitors. Community members affect each other’s well-being and have a shared interest in creating and sustaining an environment where all community members and their points of view are valued and respected. Affirming the value of each member of the university community, the campus asks that all its members adhere to the principles of civility and community adopted by the campus: http://civility.utk.edu/.

    Disability Services

    Any student who feels he or she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS) at 865-974-6087 in 2227 Dunford Hall to document their eligibility for services. ODS will work with students and faculty to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.

    Your Role in Improving Teaching and Learning Through Course Assessment

    At UT, it is our collective responsibility to improve the state of teaching and learning. During the semester, you may be requested to assess aspects of this course either during class or at the completion of the class. You are encouraged to respond to these various forms of assessment as a means of continuing to improve the quality of the UT learning experience.

    Classroom Etiquette

    While your instructor, your peer, or guest lecturer is conducting a presentation you are expected to pay complete attention to what they are presenting. It is not only rude, but also distracting to the presenter and other students in class when you are working on the computer, personal portable devices, cell phones, or behaving in any manner that is disruptive to them. If you are engaging in activities such as surfing the web, writing a paper, reading/writing email, working on class assignments, answering your cell phone, Skyping or any other disruptive activities in class you will be asked to leave for the day. If your disrespectful and disruptive behaviors continue, you will lose points from course participation, which will affect negatively on your final grade for this course. Make sure that your cell phone and/or beeper are turned off or set on manner mode. Please inform the instructor before class session begins if your are experiencing circumstances that warrant your cell phone/beeper to be turned on, such as extreme weather conditions that may put your family members in danger.

    Assignment

    Research Participation and Writing Contributions 500 points Pass/Fail
    We will engage in a class research. We will all engage in literature review, data analysis, and writing findings. You will share your work to class members electronically where your contribution will be recorded. As part of your participation in class research, you will be required to prepare outlines, sample writing, and proof reading  as part of the literature review, analysis, or findings.

    Career Planning Book Review or Interview Presentation 200 points Pass/Fail
    You will engage in a book review or an interview that will help you move forward with your career as a doctoral student or your career after your doctorate degree. You will lead a 15 minute class discussion related to the book review/interview. There is no written requirement for this assignment and instead your assignment completion will be assessed based on your presentation.

    Prepare your CV and Resume 100 points Pass/Fail
    By the end of the semester you will prepare a CV and a Resume that you will submit with your Teaching, Research, and Service Statements.

    Teaching, Research, and Service Statements 200 points Pass/Fail
    As part of this class you will prepare a teaching, research, and service statement. You will review examples in class, and will have opportunities to submit drafts and receive peer feedback.

    Course Assessment

    Assignments and Total Possible Points
    Assignments  Possible Points
    Ongoing Research Participation and Writing Contributions 500

    Assignments Possible Points
    Career Planning Book Review or Interview Presentation 200

    Assignments Possible Points
    Prepare your CV and Resume  100

    Assignments Possible Points
    Teaching, Research, and Service Statements  200

     Total Possible Points
     1000pts

    Assignment of Final Grade

    Grades are updated regularly in Canvas. Final grades will be given according to the UT grading guidelines for S/NP.

    Criteria

    S/NP (carries credit hours, but no quality points) S is equivalent to a grade of B or better, and NC means no credit earned. A grade of Satisfactory/No Credit is allowed only where indicated in the course description in the Graduate Catalog. The number of Satisfactory/No Credit courses in a student's program is limited to one-fourth of the total credit hours required.

    Academic Honesty

    Academic integrity is a responsibility of all members of the academic community. An honor statement is included on the application for admission and readmission. The applicant’s signature acknowledges that adherence is confirmed. The honor statement declares

    An essential feature of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is a commitment to maintaining an atmosphere of intellectual integrity and academic honesty. As a student of the university, I pledge that I will neither knowingly give nor receive any inappropriate assistance in academic work, thus affirming my own personal commitment to honor and integrity.

    You are expected to complete your own work. You cannot re-submit work here that was done for previous classes.

    Plagiarism

    Students shall not plagiarize. Plagiarism is using the intellectual property or product of someone else without giving proper credit. The undocumented use of someone else’s words or ideas in any medium of communication (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge) is a serious offense subject to disciplinary action that may include failure in a course and/or dismissal from the university. Some examples of plagiarism are
    • Using without proper documentation (quotation marks and a citation) written or spoken words, phrases, or sentences from any source.
    • Summarizing without proper documentation (usually a citation) ideas from another source (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge).
    • Borrowing facts, statistics, graphs, pictorial representations, or phrases without acknowledging the source (unless such information is recognized as common knowledge).
    • Submitting work, either in whole or in part, created by a professional service and used without attribution (e.g., paper, speech, bibliography, or photograph).

    Extreme caution should be exercised by students involved in collaborative research to avoid questions of plagiarism. If in doubt, students should check with the major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School about the project. Plagiarism will be investigated when suspected and prosecuted if established.

    For this class, plagiarism will result in a zero on the assignment and a meeting with your academic advisor.

    Academic writing conventions and abilities

    All assignments must conform to the style and reference notation format outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  The APA manual is an essential tool for graduate school academic writing.  Please study it carefully and refer to it often.  If you are unsure about particular APA formatting and citation rules, refer to the manual. 

    The ability to write in an appropriate academic manner is critical to successful graduate study. If you find that you need assistance with your writing, please visit the university’s free Writing Center housed in the English department:  http://web.utk.edu/~english/writing/writing.shtml. They do not proofread or edit your work, but they can help with idea development and organization – key elements of successful academic writing.

    Schedule

    *Please note that readings must be completed by the date they appear in the schedule.
    *All Assignments are due 11:59pm the day it is due.

    Week 1

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    1/23

    Introduction
    Course Expectations, Canvas, Collaborative Research Planning, selection of readings for next couple weeks

    Research: Access to data, and navigate the data

    Readings
    Paulus, Woodside, & Ziegler (2008)
    Paulus, Woodside, & Ziegler (2010)

    Week 2

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    1/30

    Discussion
    Navigating Faculty Mentored Collaborative Research with Students

    Research
    Review data and discuss

    Readings
    Welfare, Sackettm, & Moorefield-Lang (2011)

    Week 3

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    2/6

    Discussion
    Ethical and Mutually Beneficial Authorship

    Research
    Get acclimated to data

    Readings
    Fine & Kurdek (1993)
    Sandler & Russell (2005)

    Week 4

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    2/13

    Discussion
    Literature review

    Research

    Readings
    Boote & Beile (2005)
    Denney & Tewksbury (2013)

    Week 5

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    2/20

    Discussion
    Journal Writing and Dissertation Writing

    Research

    Readings
    See sample provided in Google Drive

    Assignment

    Week 6

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    2/27

    Discussion
    Academic Job Hunting, Cover Letters, and CVs

    Research

    Readings
    Samples provided in Google Drive
    Kelsky (2015) Chapter, 11, 14, & 24

    Week 7

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    3/6

    Discussion
    Faculty Tenure and Promotion Policies and Dossier Preparation

    Research

    Readings
    Samples provided in Google Drive

    Week 8

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    3/4

    Discussion
    Getting Advice to Navigate Graduate School

    Research

    Readings
    Kelsky (2015) Chapter 12

    Week 9

    Day

    Topic


     

    3/13

    Spring Break



    Week 10

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    3/20

    Discussion
    Off the Tenure Track

    Research

    Readings
    Basalla & Debelius (2015) Chapter 4

    Assignment
    Career Planning Book Review or Interview Presentation

    Week 11

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    3/27

    Discussion

    Research

    Readings

    Week 12

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    4/3

    Discussion

    Research

    Readings

    Assignment
    Prepare your CV and Resume

    Week 13

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    4/10

    Discussion
    Diversity Issues in Higher Education

    Research

    Readings
    Kelsky (2015) Chapter 12
    Matthews (2016) Introduction

    Draft: Teaching, Research, and Service Statements

    Week 14

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    4/17

    Participant Work Week


    Week 15

    Day

    Topic

    Assignments/Readings

     

    4/24

    Discussion
    Research Project Debrief and

    Teaching, Research, and Service Statements Presentation

    Assignment
    Teaching, Research, and Service Statements



    Weekly Readings

    Week 1
    Paulus, T., Woodside, M., & Ziegler, M. (2008). Extending the Conversation: Qualitative Research as Dialogic Collaborative Process. The Qualitative Report, 13(2), 226–243.

    Paulus, T. M., Woodside, M., & Ziegler, M. F. (2010). “I Tell You, It’s a Journey, Isn’t It?” Understanding Collaborative Meaning Making in Qualitative Research. Qualitative Inquiry, 16(10), 852–862. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800410383124.

    Week 2
    Welfare, L. E., & Sackett, C. R. (2011). The authorship determination process in student-faculty collaborative research. Journal of Counseling and Development, 89(4), 479.

    Week 3
    Fine, M. A., & Kurdek, L. A. (1993). Reflections on determining authorship credit and authorship order on faculty-student collaborations. American Psychologist, 48(11), 1141–1147. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org.proxy.lib.utk.edu:90/10.1037/0003-066X.48.11.1141

    Sandler, J. C., & Russell, B. L. (2005). Faculty-Student Collaborations: Ethics and Satisfaction in Authorship Credit. Ethics & Behavior, 15(1), 65–80. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327019eb1501_5

    Week 4
    Boote, D. N., & Beile, P. (2005). Scholars before Researchers: On the Centrality of the Dissertation Literature Review in Research Preparation. Educational Researcher, 34(6), 3–15.

    Denney, A. S., & Tewksbury, R. (2013). How to Write a Literature Review. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 24(2), 218–234. https://doi.org/10.1080/10511253.2012.730617

    Week 5
    See sample provided in Google Drive

    Week 6
    See sample provided in Google Drive
    Kelsky, K. (2015). The professor is in: The Essential guide to turning your Ph.D. into a job. New York: Three Rivers Press.

    Week 7
    See sample provided in Google Drive

    Week 8
    Kelsky, K. (2015). The professor is in: The Essential guide to turning your Ph.D. into a job. New York: Three Rivers Press.\

    Week 10
    Basalla, S., & Debelius, M. (2015). “So what are you going to do with that?”: Finding careers outside academia. (3 edition). Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.

    Week 11
    To be determined

    Week 12
    To be determined

    Week 13
    Kelsky, K. (2015). The professor is in: The Essential guide to turning your Ph.D. into a job. New York: Three Rivers Press.

    Matthew, P. A. (Ed.). (2016). Written/unwritten: Diversity and the hidden truths of tenure. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press.

    Week 14
    Participant Work Week

    Week 15
    Presentations